Environment California Research and Policy Center Latest Blog Posts

The video provides visceral imagery of the suffering caused by single-use plastic. Marine animals, like this turtle, ...do not deserve to suffer extraordinary pain because of the vast quantities of disposable plastic products that end up in the sea. 

Earlier this month, a group of legislators from both coasts signed onto a wave of eight bills in Congress aimed at blocking the Trump administration’s offshore drilling plan.

As the dust settles on the final hours of COP 21—the United Nations’ attempt to stave off the worst impacts of global warming by getting countries to agree to limit global warming pollution—there is a lot to learn and a roadmap of next steps that need to happen.

The bottom line is, California is a great place to look for many of the answers the UN is struggling with as an agreement is negotiated. Governor Brown, Air Resources Board Chair Nichols, Senate Pro-Tem De León, Speaker Atkins and Speaker-elect Rendon, Senator Lara and more, all have experience tackling these hard issues and can offer strong leadership.

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John Rumpler
Senior Director, Clean Water for America Campaign and Senior Attorney

Why do we need federal protection under the Clean Water Act if there are also state laws designed to protect our rivers and streams? The answer is that, all too often, state officials fail to enforce their own laws or side with politically-powerful polluters.

As the world struggles during the next two weeks (and beyond) to stave off the worst impacts of global warming, I hope leaders will look to California and see that it can be done.

We all want our teeth to be clean after brushing, and our bodies to be clean after showering, but did you know the products used in these everyday activities could be harming wildlife? Hundreds of commonly-used household products contain tiny plastic microbeads, which can be a big problem for our environment. 

Last year at this time, the toxic algae bloom in Lake Erie caused nearly half a million people in and around Toledo, Ohio, to be without safe drinking water. Clean water from our taps is something that many of us take for granted, but if we don’t protect our water sources — like the residents of Toledo discovered — we won’t be able to take it for granted anymore.

The Marine Exchange is housed in a small hilltop building in Angel’s Gate Park in City Council District 15. Blessed with steady winds and reliable sunshine, it is perfectly positioned to generate its own power. In 2012, the Marine Exchange installed four wind turbines and 286 solar panels, enough to produce 87 kilowatts of energy during times of peak production. The wind turbines and most of the solar panels are located on the building’s roof; additional panels are placed on the ground around the building. Wind and solar now meet all of the Marine Exchange’s electricity needs, with some power leftover to feed back into the grid.