Environment California Research and Policy Center Latest Blog Posts

 | by
Laura Deehan
State Director, Environment California

California is eyeing ambitious goals for how much energy should be coming from offshore wind over the next 30 years. 

 | by
John Rumpler
Senior Director, Clean Water for America Campaign and Senior Attorney

Legislators in Missouri and Colorado have just approved bills requiring remediation when lead in schools' drinking water exceeds 5 parts per billion (ppb). The new limits are a step in the right direction, and they come on the wake of our updated map showing widespread lead contamination of schools' water across the country.  

Yet stronger action will be needed to ensure safe drinking water for our kids. Lead can harm children at very low levels, and lead concentrations in water can vary, and so these "test and remediate" policies are likely to leave many sources of contamination unfixed. A better approach is for schools to pro-actively get the lead out - for example, replacing all lead-bearing water fountains with new water bottle stations that have filters certified to remove lead. 

Fortunately, schools have the resources to go beyond the new legislation.  Families, community leaders and school officials can find more information in our Get the Lead Out toolkit.

 | by
Laura Deehan
State Director, Environment California

One of the state’s largest potential clean energy resources isn’t “in” California at all, but rather just off the coast. Offshore wind energy has been generating clean electricity in other parts of the world for decades and California is taking the opening steps toward unlocking its massive potential.

In a victory for marine life, climate, Biden administration cancels three oil leases in ocean waters. 

 | by
Johanna Neumann
Senior Director, Campaign for 100% Renewable Energy

How American wind energy surpassed coal and nuclear for the first time in history

 | by
Johanna Neumann
Senior Director, Campaign for 100% Renewable Energy

The final edition in a series on how to electrify your home and transition to appliances that can run on renewable energy

 | by
Benjamin Grundy
Global Warming Solutions Campaign Associate, Environment California

This Earth Day, more than one billion people around the world will unite to celebrate the beauty of our world and continue to advocate for its protection. From climate change to plastic pollution, our natural spaces and species are at risk of great harm. Despite the abundance of “doom-and-gloom narratives,” we must remember that it is not too late to save our planet. We still have time to avoid the worst effects of climate change.

The rise of solar power since the first Earth Day is just one example of how far we’ve come

The Home Depot has the opportunity to protect our climate, biodiversity and people. Consumers urge the company to step up.

Celebrating the nation’s progress since the Biden administration set its national goal