Reports

Report | Environment California Research and Policy Center

In the Path of the Storm

4 out of 5 Californians live in areas hit by recent weather disasters. 

Report | Environment California Research and Policy Center

Wasting Our Waterways

The Environment California Research and Policy Center report documents and analyzes the dangerous levels of pollutants discharged to America’s waters by compiling toxic chemical releases reported to the U.S. EPA’s Toxics Release Inventory for 2010.

Report | Environment California Research and Policy Center

Building a Better America

California families could save over $450 every year on their electricity bills by 2030 if the government invests in the energy efficiency of our buildings today, according to a new report by Environment California Research and Policy Center.  Saving energy in our buildings would also help California’s fight against global warming, reducing global warming pollution from buildings by 35% – the equivalent of taking 12.6 million cars off the road.

Report | Environment California Research & Policy Center

Fukushima: One Year Later

The Fukushima Daiichi disaster raised fresh concerns about the safety of America’s nuclear power plants and the wisdom of building new nuclear power plants in the United States. One year after the deadly earthquake and tsunami that spawned the meltdowns at Fukushima, new information continues to emergy about the events that took place at Fukushima and the implications for the people of Japan and the future of nuclear power.

This issue brief provides an update on the situation at Fukushima on the first anniversary of the disaster.

 

Report | Environment California Research & Policy Center

California's Solar Cities 2012

California’s solar market is thriving. Ten years ago, solar panels atop roofs were a rarity. Today, solar is taking hold in cities across the state, from coastal metropolises to agricultural and industrial hubs in the Central Valley. In the past two years alone, the solar industry has installed more than 5,000 kilowatts of solar power in each of 10 different California cities.

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