Home


 

More Research, Policy, Education & Action

Report | Environment California Research and Policy Center

Toxic Baby Furniture

Furnishings containing formaldehyde – a toxic chemical linked with allergies, asthma, and cancer – can contaminate indoor air within California homes. Babies and young children are particularly vulnerable to harm.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment California Research & Policy Center

Driving Towards A New Energy Future

Legislation to increase Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE)standards for cars and trucks was included in the Senate energy bill (H.R. 6) that was passed in June of this year, marking the first time in over thirty years that either House of Congress has passed an increase in CAFE standards.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment California Research & Policy Center

New Report Documents California's Outstanding Clean Energy Leadership

The State of California has been rated a gold star for its outstanding leadership in promoting clean energy and global warming solutions, according to a report released today by Environment California Research & Policy Center.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment California Research & Policy Center

Group Calls for More Solar Power

Environment California Research & Policy Center released a report today on solar water heating technologies along with a coalition of policy makers, environmental groups and businesses.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment California Research & Policy Center

Solar Water Heating: How California Can Reduce Its Dependence on Natural Gas

Solar hot water systems capture energy from the sun to heat water for homes and businesses, thereby displacing the use of natural gas, or in some cases electricity, with free and limitless solar energy. Solar hot water could save California 1.2 billion therms of natural gas a year, the equivalent of 24 percent of all gas use in homes. To prevent global warming pollution, re­duce dependence on imported fuel, and ease the price of natural gas, California should act now by jumpstarting a main­stream market for solar hot water.

> Keep Reading

Pages